Hong Kong Airport Protesters flooded airport terminal travel suspended

Hong Kong Airport Protesters flooded the terminal travel suspended

 

Thousands of protesters in black flooded the terminal on Monday afternoon, and outbound travel was suspended at the Hong Kong International Airport. The police’s rage all night angered the mobilization, filling the interior of several subway stations with tear gas, and several demonstrators were seriously injured.

As anti-government protests enter Sunday night for a tenth consecutive week, a shocking escalation, it is reported that a young woman believed to be a volunteer medic was shot blinded in one eye. Elsewhere in the city, police were captured in the video, apparently firing crowd control weapons at demonstrators within close range of the enclosed space. Police were also seen chasing people down the escalator while waving their baton.

“I came out today to reject violence by the Hong Kong government and police,” said Matthew (22), an IT protester. “What we saw on TV yesterday was that the police used any means of violence that could be used, which was crazy.”

Protests in Asian financial centers show no signs of abating. Violence has escalated in recent weeks between authorities on both sides and a small group of radical protesters who fired bricks, Molotov cocktails and other projectiles at police lines. So far, the government’s response has been to authorize more force, provoke public outrage, and expand mistrust of authority in times of crisis.

Hong Kong and Macau top policy officials, Yang Guang, condemned the demonstrators in a speech to reporters on Monday. He said demonstrators attacked the police station with petrol bombs and wounded several police officers. In describing the escalation of turmoil, Kwang said that “radical protesters” had committed serious crimes and “began to sow the seeds of terrorism.”

Also on Monday, journalists and lawmakers were invited to watch Hong Kong police show how they would use armoured vehicles equipped with water guns, and Amnesty International warned that it could cause serious injuries in the city’s densely populated streets.

The protest was in response to a government proposal that originally allowed fugitives to be transferred to mainland China, but quickly evolved into a larger movement demanding more democracy in the semi-autonomous region of China. The city’s leader and chief executive, Carrie Lam, has suspended the offending legislation but has refused to officially withdraw it.

Protesters demand a full withdrawal of the bill, an amnesty for all demonstrators arrested for the riots, the withdrawal of the government’s description of the protests as “riots”, independent investigations into allegations of police use of force, and implementation of universal voting rights. What the Hong Kong Charter promises.

“I came out today to reject violence by the Hong Kong government and police,” said Matthew (22), an IT protester. “What we saw on TV yesterday was that the police used any means of violence that could be used, which was crazy.”

Protests in Asian financial centers show no signs of abating. Violence has escalated in recent weeks between authorities on both sides and a small group of radical protesters who fired bricks, Molotov cocktails and other projectiles at police lines. So far, the government’s response has been to authorize more force, provoke public outrage, and expand mistrust of authority in times of crisis.

Hong Kong and Macau top policy officials, Yang Guang, condemned the demonstrators in a speech to reporters on Monday. He said demonstrators attacked the police station with petrol bombs and wounded several police officers. In describing the escalation of turmoil, Kwang said that “radical protesters” had committed serious crimes and “began to sow the seeds of terrorism.”

Also on Monday, journalists and lawmakers were invited to watch Hong Kong police show how they would use armoured vehicles equipped with water guns, and Amnesty International warned that it could cause serious injuries in the city’s densely populated streets.

The protest was in response to a government proposal that originally allowed fugitives to be transferred to mainland China, but quickly evolved into a larger movement demanding more democracy in the semi-autonomous region of China. The city’s leader and chief executive, Carrie Lam, has suspended the offending legislation but has refused to officially withdraw it.

Protesters demand a full withdrawal of the bill, an amnesty for all demonstrators arrested for the riots, the withdrawal of the government’s characterization of protests as “riots,” independent investigations into allegations of police use of force, and implementation of universal voting rights. What the Hong Kong Charter promises.

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